Red Velvet Lunch Box Cake

$20.00

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Red Velvet Lunch Box Cake

Our Red Velvet Lunch Box Cake is the perfect gift for your Valentine, Galentine or YOURSELF! The perfect treat for a mild chocolatey flavor with creamy cream cheese frosting decorated for the holiday.

Delight in the luscious flavors of a Keto Red Velvet Lunch Box Cake—a convenient and portable treat designed for those adhering to a low-carb lifestyle. This compact dessert packs all the rich, velvety charm of traditional red velvet cake without compromising on your ketogenic goals.

Crafted with almond flour as the cornerstone, this lunch box-sized cake maintains a low-carb profile while offering a tender crumb and satisfying texture.Frosted with luxurious cream cheese frosting. Sweetened with keto-friendly alternativemonfruit with erythritol, the Keto Red Velvet Lunch Box Cake strikes the perfect balance of sweetness without spiking your carbohydrate intake. The creaminess of high-quality butter or other low-carb fat sources adds a luxurious depth to the flavor profile, creating a sumptuous experience that satisfies your sweet cravings.

INGREDIENTS: CREAM CHEESE, ERYTHRITOL (SWERVE), EGGS, BUTTER, MONKFRUIT SWEETENER WITH ERYTHRITOL, ALMOND FLOUR, SOUR CREAM (CULTURED CREAM, ENZYMES), COCONUT FLOUR, OAT FIBER POWDER, RED FOOD COLOR, BAKING POWDER, COCOA, PURE VANILLA EXTRACT, APPLE CIDER VINEGAR

CONTAINS: MILK, EGG, ALMOND, COCONUT

 

MANUFACTURED IN A FACILITY THAT ALSO PROCESSES: MILK, EGG, PEANUTS, ALMOND, CASHEW, WALNUT, PECAN, COCONUT

According wikipedia:

Velvet cake is thought to have originated in Maryland in the early 20th century.[citation needed] In the 19th century, “velvet” cake, a soft and velvety crumb cake, came to be served as a fancy dessert, in contrast to what had been the more common, coarser-crumbed cake. Around the turn of the 20th century, devil’s food cake was introduced, which is how some believe that red velvet cake came about. The key difference between the two cakes is that devil’s food cake uses chocolate and red velvet cake uses cocoa.[5]

When foods were rationed in the US during World War II, bakers used boiled beet juices to enhance the color of their cakes. Beet was and is used in some recipes as a filler or to retain moisture.[6] Adams Extract is credited with bringing the red velvet cake to kitchens across America during the Great Depression era, by being one of the first to sell red food coloring and other flavor extracts with the use of point-of-sale posters and tear-off recipe cards.[7][8] The cake and its original recipe are well known in the United States from New York City’s famous Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, which has been dubbed the confection Waldorf-Astoria cake. However, it is widely considered a Southern recipe.[9] Traditionally, red velvet cake is iced with a French-style butter ermine icing (also called roux icing though, while containing butter and flour, it is not made from a roux),[10] which is very light and fluffy, but time-consuming to prepare. Cream cheese frosting and buttercream frosting are variations that have increased in popularity.[11][12]

In Canada, the cake was a well-known dessert in the restaurants and bakeries of the Eaton’s department store chain in the 1940s and 1950s. Promoted as an exclusive Eaton’s recipe, with employees who knew the recipe sworn to silence, many mistakenly believed the cake was the invention of the department store matriarch, Lady Eaton.[13]

In recent years, red velvet cake and red velvet cupcakes have become increasingly popular in the US and many European countries, especially around Christmas and more recently Valentine’s Day. A resurgence in the popularity of this cake is attributed by some to the 1989 film Steel Magnolias, which included a red velvet groom’s cake made in the shape of an armadillo.[9]

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